What Is Causing My Heel Pain?

By Peter Y. Siroka, DPM
June 09, 2016
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Heel Pain  

Have you suddenly developed pain in your heel and aren't sure what caused it? Dr. Peter Siroka, Your Stamford, CT, podiatrist, shares information on several common conditions that cause heel pain.Heel Pain

Heel pain causes

Your pain may be caused by one of these conditions:

  • Stone bruise: If you've ever stepped on a rock or a stray Lego, you know how painful stone bruises can be. Although the pain eventually goes away on its own, it's no fun walking when you have a bruise. Stone bruises can also occur if you wear running shoes without enough padding, or you don't replace your worn running shoes often enough.
  • Plantar fasciitis: Inflammation of the plantar fascia can cause heel pain. The fascia is a tough band of tissue that connects your heel to your toes.
  • Heel spurs: Once you recover from plantar fasciitis, your pain may not end. It's not unusual to develop heel spurs at the site where your heel bone connects to your plantar fascia after a bout of plantar fasciitis. Though these calcium deposits can also develop even if you've never had the condition.
  • Achilles tendinitis: This injury affects people who spend a lot of time on their feet and runners. If you have this injury, you may notice a bump on the back of your heel.
  • Retrocalcaneal bursitis: Your retrocalcaneal bursa is a fluid-filled sac located at the spot where your Achilles tendon connects your heel to your calf muscle. Running, walking or jumping can cause inflammation of the bursa, particularly if you suddenly increase the duration or intensity of your workout.

How can a podiatrist help me?

Your Stamford foot doctor offers several types of treatments that will reduce your heel pain. Prescription pain medications and cortisone injections may provide pain relief while physical therapy is helpful in stretching and strengthening the muscles that support your heel and lower foot. Your podiatrist may recommend that you wear special shoe inserts that relieve pressure on the heel or a walking boot, depending on the severity of your problem. Although surgery generally isn't needed for heel injuries, in some cases, it's the best option.

When your heel pain doesn't go away on its own, it's time for a visit to your podiatrist. Call Dr. Siroka, your Stamford, CT, podiatrist, at (203) 614-8185 to schedule an appointment.

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